Indian Diary industry

History and Evolution of Dairy Industry:

In this blog we will talk about History of dairy industry in India, Operation Flood, White Revolution, National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), Value added dairy products, Milk production in India, Dairy farming in India, Dairy cooperatives in India, Milk composition, Milk consumption in India, Future of dairy industry in India.

In earlier days in India, dairying was just household activity. Milk was produced to meet household requirement; it was not commercialised till then. Even when it started commercialisation, Farmer would sell their milk to local merchants, who then sell it to end consumer. It was not organised and even the quality was often poor, and there was no way to ensure its purity.

Just after some years of Independence, The Govt of India took initiative to develop dairy industry. In this process it develops, National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) in 1949 to give boost to dairy sector in India. The NDDB played a key role in introducing modern dairying practices in India, such as artificial insemination, cross-breeding, and improved feeding methods. These practices helped to improve the quality and quantity of milk production in India.

In 1970, NDDB launched Operation Flood, which was the world’s biggest dairy development program gave a major push to India’s dairy sector and generated sustainable economic model and employment opportunity to poor farmers. In 2011, India produced 156 million tons of milk, which is more than any other country in the world. The dairy industry is now a major contributor to the Indian economy, and it is expected to continue to grow in the years to come.

The operation flood are well organised and well-funded, It diverse participation of stakeholders, including farmer, milk producers, and the government make it big success. Operation Flood was a major success, and it helped to transform the Indian dairy industry.

The story of the Indian dairy industry is a success story. It is a story of how a government program helped to improve the lives of millions of people and to make India a more prosperous country. It is also a story of how innovation and collaboration can help to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems.

Value Added product:

The growth in the value added products of milk has helped to improve the livelihoods of millions of dairy farmers in India. It has also contributed to the country’s food security.

The future of the value added products of milk in India is bright. The demand for milk and milk products is expected to continue to grow, and the government is committed to supporting the dairy sector. With the continued investment in technology and practices, India is well-positioned to become a major exporter of value added milk products in the coming years.

This growth is due to a number of factors, including:

  • The government’s support for the dairy sector, such as the National Dairy Development Board (NDDB).
  • The increasing demand for milk and milk products in India.
  • The improvement in the quality of animal feed.
  • The introduction of new technologies and practices, such as artificial insemination and cross-breeding.

Country wise Milk Production:

The image shows the percentage of milk production in the world by country. The top 10 countries in terms of milk production are:

  1. India (22%): India is the world’s largest producer of milk, accounting for about 22% of the world’s total production. This is due to a number of factors, including a large and growing population, a favorable climate, abundant water resources, and government support.
  2. United States (14%): The United States is the second largest producer of milk, followed by China, Brazil, and Russia. The United States has a long history of dairy farming and a well-developed dairy industry.
  3. China (10%): China is the third largest producer of milk, and its production is growing rapidly. This is due to a number of factors, including a growing population, increasing disposable income, and government support for the dairy industry.
  4. Brazil (8%): Brazil is the fourth largest producer of milk, and its production is also growing rapidly. This is due to the country’s favorable climate and abundant water resources.
  5. Russia (6%): Russia is the fifth largest producer of milk, and its production has been declining in recent years. This is due to a number of factors, including a decline in the number of dairy farms and the impact of economic sanctions.

The rest of the world accounts for the remaining 25% of milk production. These countries include Germany, France, Pakistan, Turkey, Netherlands, and other countries.

Current situation of milk in India and its composition:


The chart 1 shows the milk production in India and the world from 1991 to 2022. The world milk production has been increasing steadily over the years, while the Indian milk production has been increasing at a much faster pace. In 2022, India produced 221.1 million tones of milk, which is more than any other country in the world.

The other reason for the growth in milk production is the increasing demand for milk and milk products in India. The population of India is growing rapidly, and the average income is also increasing. This has led to an increase in the demand for milk and milk products.

The main reason for the rapid growth in milk production in India is the government’s support for the dairy sector. The government has implemented a number of schemes to promote dairy farming, such as providing financial assistance to farmers, setting up dairy cooperatives, and providing marketing support.

The future of milk production in India is bright. The demand for milk and milk products is expected to continue to grow, and the government is committed to supporting the dairy sector. With the continued investment in the dairy sector, India is well-positioned to become the world’s leading producer of milk in the coming years.

Here are some other key takeaways from the chart:

  • The Indian milk production has increased by about 150% since 1991.
  • The world milk production has increased by about 40% since 1991.

The Chart 2 is a pie chart showing the percentage of different types of milk in a milk basket. The pie chart is divided into four slices, each representing a different type of milk. The slices are labeled as follows:

  • Sheep milk: 1%
  • Goat milk: 1%
  • Buffalo milk: 33%
  • Cow milk: 65%

The pie chart shows that cow milk is the most common type of milk in the basket, followed by buffalo milk. Goat milk and sheep milk are the least common types of milk in the basket.

Market Share of Milk in India in 2023

The pie chart shows the market share of milk in India in 2023. The largest market share is held by Amul, a dairy cooperative society based in Gujarat, with 30%. Mother Dairy, a government-owned enterprise, comes in second with 15%. Other major players in the market include Vadilal, Nestle India, and Parag Milk Foods, each with around 10% market share. The remaining 37% of the market is held by a variety of smaller players.

Amul is the leading milk brand in India, and its products are available across the country. The company is known for its high-quality milk and dairy products, and it has a strong distribution network. Mother Dairy is also a major player in the market, and its products are popular in the Delhi-NCR region. Vadilal is a leading manufacturer of ice cream and other dairy products, and it has a strong presence in the western and southern parts of India. Nestle India is a multinational company that has a wide range of dairy products, including milk, yogurt, and cheese. Parag Milk Foods is a leading manufacturer of dairy products in the north Indian market. The Indian dairy market is expected to grow at a CAGR of around 15% in the next few years. This growth is being driven by a number of factors, including increasing demand for milk and dairy products, rising disposable incomes, and growing urbanization. The market is also expected to benefit from the government’s initiatives to promote dairy farming and consumption.

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